eng рус ch
Under the patronage of
  • 22.12.2021
    Open
    for entries
  • 01.03.2022
    Entries
    close
  • 15.06.2022
    Shortlist
    announcement
  • 01.07.2022
    Open
    online vote
  • September 2022
    Winner's list,
    awards ceremony
  • September 2022
    Opening of the
    photo exhibition
Top News

Just Numb

Series
Just NumbJust NumbJust NumbJust NumbJust NumbJust NumbJust NumbJust NumbJust NumbJust NumbJust NumbJust Numb
Just Numb
Just Numb
Just Numb
Just Numb
Just Numb
Just Numb
Just Numb
Just Numb
Just Numb
Just Numb
Just Numb
Just Numb
Just NumbAn aerial view shows the neighborhood in Cambridge Shores, Kentucky, devastated by a tornado on Christmas Day in 2021. With the help of volunteers from around the country, families in western Kentucky were able to celebrate Christmas two weeks after a string of tornadoes wrought a path of deadly destruction. At least 79 people lost their lives in the tornados, which passed over several states from the night of December 10 to the early morning of December 11.
Tammy Beavers recovers a US flag found in the debris of her destroyed home in Dawson Springs, Kentucky, on December 14, 2021, four days after tornadoes hit the area. Kentucky officials voiced relief on December 13 that dozens of workers at a candle factory appear to have survived the tornadoes that killed at least 88 people and left a trail of devastation across six US states.
This aerial image taken on December 13, 2021, shows tornado damage after extreme weather hit the region in Mayfield, Kentucky.
Ginny Watts (center) hugs her friend as they help clean her destroyed home in Dawson Springs, Kentucky, on December 14, 2021, four days after tornadoes hit the area. It is normally a joyous season, but in tornado-blasted Kentucky, thousands of families are in crisis days before Christmas.
This aerial view shows a tree that fell on a house in Cayce, Kentucky, on December 15, 2021, five days after tornadoes hit the area. In Cayce, population 119, most buildings were damaged or completely destroyed. While the community was partially isolated for four days after the storm, a federal emergency team finally arrived on December 15, as did volunteers and a flood of donations.
Andrew Humphrey, 13, son of Dawn Humphrey, cleans his destroyed home in Dawson Springs, Kentucky, on December 14, 2021, four days after tornadoes hit the area. It is normally a joyous season, but in tornado-blasted Kentucky, thousands of families are in crisis days before Christmas, including 13-year-old Andrew Humphrey, recently made homeless by the worst storm in state history. As they throw down debris from where their second-floor apartment used to be, Andrew, and his two older teen brothers play the part of grown-ups joining scores of others in the tedious and heart-wrenching task of post-disaster cleanup.
The Legion Theater lies destroyed in Mayfield, Kentucky, on December 16, 2021, six days after tornadoes hit the area.
Andrew Humphrey, 13, (left), son of Dawn Humphrey, works together with his brothers to clear their destroyed home in Dawson Springs, Kentucky, on December 14, 2021, four days after tornadoes hit the area. It is normally a joyous season, but in tornado-blasted Kentucky, thousands of families are in crisis days before Christmas, including 13-year-old Andrew Humphrey's, recently made homeless by the worst storm in state history. As they throw down debris from where their second-floor apartment used to be, Andrew, and his two older teen brothers play the part of grown-ups joining scores of others in the tedious and heart-wrenching task of post-disaster cleanup.
Debbie Cansler's destroyed kitchen at her home in Dawson Springs, Kentucky, on December 14, 2021, four days after tornadoes hit the area. It is normally a joyous season, but in tornado-blasted Kentucky, thousands of families are in crisis days before Christmas.
Sam Stone pets his dog Homer outside his destroyed house in Fulgham, Kentucky, on December 15, 2021, five days after tornadoes hit the area. Sam ponders the rickety remnants of his modest rural home, and while he is grateful to be alive after a monster tornado, recovery has been a test of self-reliance -- with no official assistance five days after the disaster hit the town.
An aerial view of a home in Dawson Springs, Kentucky, on December 14, 2021, four days after tornadoes hit the area.
People clear their destroyed homes in Dawson Springs, Kentucky, on December 14, 2021, four days after tornadoes hit the area.

The tornado that hit Kentucky affected thousands of families just days before Christmas. In total, at least 88 people died, with fatalities also recorded in Tennessee, Arkansas, Missouri, and Illinois. Many homes, businesses, and churches in Mayfield, population 10,000, have blue tarps nailed over the gaping holes left in the buildings, but on other structures, roofs and blown out windows remain open to the sky. Work crews hauled away tons of debris in western Kentucky towns pulverized by deadly tornadoes as the traumatized residents began to rebuild their shattered lives. Some locals opted to stay in their damaged houses after the tornadoes struck last week instead of moving in with family or into shelters, as others did. But the destruction that raked across six states has triggered lesser-known tragedies too, in several instances out of the reach of a huge rescue and recovery operation. Rebuilding hard-hit Kentucky cities like Mayfield and Dawson Springs will take years, with entire neighborhoods devastated.

To vote, login via any social network

Thank you! Your vote has been counted.